Image for Smashing! The dinnerware made from recycled ceramics waste

Smashing! The dinnerware made from recycled ceramics waste

Amid heightened awareness about what goes on our plates, a ceramics workshop in Liverpool has turned its attention to dinnerware itself

Amid heightened awareness about what goes on our plates, a ceramics workshop in Liverpool has turned its attention to dinnerware itself

Growing awareness about the environmental impact of our diets means people are increasingly scrutinising what goes on their plates. But what about the dinnerware itself?

Taking sustainable dining one step further is a ceramics workshop in Liverpool, which has turned its attention to recycled crockery. Granby Workshop uses waste from the ceramics, glass and stone industries to produce its line of ‘circular’ tableware.

“All manner of sludges, silts, dusts and debris” were considered, said the team. That might not sound like an appetising prospect, but Granby Workshop is quick to point out that all finished items are as safe and hygienic as any other tableware.

The workshop also says that no virgin materials are used in the plates, bowls and mugs – not even in the glaze, which is made from crushed glass, crushed bricks and dust sourced from slate, granite and marble quarries.

The workshop was able to launch the range thanks to a successful Kickstarter campaign, which raised almost £69,000 towards the project.

An estimated 68m tonnes of ceramics waste is sent to landfill in the UK each year.

Main image: Granby Workshop 

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