Global Transition Round-Up

The Transition Network has launched its new website. It includes directories of initiatives, people and projects, ‘microsites’ for different communities, up-to-date news from the network and movement, and relevant blog feeds aggregated from respected bloggers around the world.

Meanwhile, Transition Town Brixton cooked up some seasonal cabbage recipes for their ‘I Hate Cabbage’ event, as part of Brixton Village Market’s ‘Tasty January’. Another community project is being run by Transition Clitheroe, who are turning the town’s flower beds into edible vegetable patches for all to share.

Similarly, in Australia, Transition Hervey Bay and Hervey Bay Seedsavers Bank have given gifts of Pigeon Pea seeds to residents. The aim is to encourage people to transition their gardens into food production and help reduce the region’s carbon output. Transition Town Sunshine Coast has formally delivered the country’s first Energy Descent Action Plan to their regional council.

In the USA, Transition is also taking off. The town of Berea has started a community campaign called ’50×25′ to lower its energy use by 50 per cent and get 50 per cent of its food and energy from local sources, all by 2025.

February saw Japan host a one-day Transition Conference in Koganei City, to the west of Tokyo. It brought together the 12 emerging Transition Towns from across the country to share progress and explore ways to support each other in the year ahead.

Back in Britain, a growing number of Initiatives have been successful in attracting grants, while Christian Ecology Link have launched a support network for ‘Churches in Transition’. The organisation held a national conference in Scarborough on the transition to low-carbon lives and the spiritual roots of sustainable Christian living.

Contact: www.transitionnetwork.org

Transition Town Brixton at
Brixton Village market
Photo: copyright Ash Finch

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