5 ways the UK’s health benefited from the smoking ban

Ten years to the week since the introduction of the smoking ban, the number of UK smokers is at a record low. Here are 5 positive health impacts sparked by the ban

 

1. There are fewer smoking-related heart attack deaths

Figures from Public Health England released in June show a 20.8 per cent drop in the number of smokers aged 35 and over dying from heart attacks and other cardiac conditions since 2007. There were 32,548 deaths from heart disease attributable to smoking from 2007-2009, and 25,777 from 2013-2015. In 2008, immediately after the ban, the Department of Health reported a 2.4 per cent decline in heart attacks across the population.

 

2. Strokes are causing fewer deaths among smokers

The number of smokers dying from strokes has declined 14 per cent since the smoking ban. According to Public Health England, 2007-2009 saw a total of 9,743 smokers died from strokes. From 2013-2015 these fell to 8,334.

 

3. Bar workers are enjoying cleaner, stronger lungs

People working in bars, pubs and clubs reported a 27 per cent decrease in respiratory illness one year after their workplaces were declared smoke-free, according to Department of Health data.

 

4. More expectant mothers are shunning smoke

The NHS has revealed that 15.1 per cent of mothers were smoking during pregnancy when the smoking ban was introduced. That figure is now 10.5 per cent.

 

5. There has been a reduction in respiratory infections among children

Since 2007, hospitals in England have reported 11,000 fewer children being admitted with respiratory infections each year. The decline in chest, nose, throat and sinus problems is thought to be due to less exposure to second-hand smoke among children – a knock-on effect of the smoking ban.


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