Tiger population in Nepal ‘almost doubles’ in size

After 10 years of conservation work, new data from the Nepalese government suggests that the number of tigers in the country has almost doubled

After 10 years of conservation work, new data from the Nepalese government suggests that the number of tigers in the country has almost doubled

Nepal has announced that there are now an estimated 235 wild tigers in the country, nearly doubling the 2009 figure of 121. In the latest survey, which was carried out between November 2017 and April 2018, camera traps and ‘occupancy surveys’ were used to estimate numbers.

The results make Nepal the first of the 13 tiger range countries to meet the Tx2 commitment to double tiger numbers by 2022. The target was agreed at an international summit in St Petersburg in 2010.

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“Every tiger counts, for Nepal and for the world,” said Dr Ghana S Gurung, country representative for the WWF. “While Nepal is but a few tigers away from our goal to double tiger numbers by 2022, it also underscores the continued need to ensure protection, and improved and contiguous habitats for the long-term survival of the species.”

Actor Leonardo DiCaprio is chairman of the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, which has funded tiger conservation in Nepal’s Bardia National Park and elsewhere since 2010.

Every tiger counts, for Nepal and for the world

“This significant increase in Nepal’s tiger population is proof that when we work together, we can save the planet’s wildlife – even species facing extinction,” he said.

“Nepal has been a leader in efforts to double tigers within its own borders and serves as a model for conservation for all of Asia and the world. I am proud of my foundation’s partnership with WWF to support Nepal and local communities in doubling the population of wild tigers.”

Image: a Bengal tiger

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