Image for Six white-tailed eagles reintroduced as part of five-year project

Six white-tailed eagles reintroduced as part of five-year project

The birds have been released on the Isle of Wight in an effort to restore the species to southern England

The birds have been released on the Isle of Wight in an effort to restore the species to southern England

Six white-tailed eagles have been released on the Isle of White as part of a conservation effort to reintroduce the species to southern England.

Also known as sea eagles, the species has not been seen in southern England for 240 years. The six young birds are part of a five-year restoration plan led by Forestry England and the Roy Dennis Wildlife Foundation. They have been brought to the Isle of Wight, in Hampshire, from the wild in Scotland.

Roy Dennis, founder of the eponymous wildlife foundation, described releasing the birds as “a truly special moment”.

Good journalism about good things Rebalance your media diet with Positive News, the inspiring current affairs magazine. A carbon neutral publication, featuring stories of social and environmental progress alongside impactful photography and stunning visual design. Subscribe to Positive News magazine

“Establishing a population of white-tailed eagles in the south of England will link and support emerging populations of these birds in the Netherlands, France and Ireland, with the aim of restoring the species to the southern half of Europe,” he said.

“We have seen from other reintroduction programmes that returning lost species offers real benefits for nature and the health of our environment, and to people and local economies.”

Returning lost species offers real benefits for nature and the health of our environment

The Isle of Wight was chosen both for the coastal habitat it can provide the birds and its central location along the southern English coastline, which will hopefully allow the eagles to disperse to the east and the west.

The team will initially continue to provide feeding sites for the birds to encourage them to settle. The birds have been fitted with satellite trackers so their progress can be monitored, and data will be made available on the Roy Dennis Wildlife Foundation website. Around six white-tailed eagles are expected to be released each year for five years as part of the programme.

Image: Mike Crutch

Fed up with negative news? Can you help us?

The negativity bias in the media is holding society back. While it’s important to report problems and hold power to account, we believe there is also a need for rigorous reporting on progress, possibility and solutions. We call this ‘constructive journalism’, and to keep doing it we need your help.

We know you want Positive News to benefit as many people as possible, so we haven’t put up a paywall. We don’t answer to and rely on a wealthy proprietor because, instead, we are owned co-operatively by 1,500 of our readers who joined our crowdfund in 2015. And we’re not beholden to advertisers either, because we know that you only want to hear about companies that have a positive impact.

So, instead, we depend on you. Positive News is more than a magazine, it’s a community of people who see and share the good in the world. We need your support to continue publishing our inspiring journalism and to set the example for other media to follow. It’s quick and easy to contribute and you can support Positive News from just £1. Every contribution makes a vital difference. Thank you for helping us to change the news for good.

GET A ROUND-UP OF POSITIVE NEWS STORIES IN YOUR INBOX EVERY WEEKSign up to our newsletter