Image for 1,000 volunteers help Brighton beach’s post-Pride clean up

1,000 volunteers help Brighton beach’s post-Pride clean up

The Big Pride Beach Clean saw more than two tonnes of waste collected from Brighton beach and manually sorted by volunteers

The Big Pride Beach Clean saw more than two tonnes of waste collected from Brighton beach and manually sorted by volunteers

More than 1,000 volunteers supported a community initiative in Brighton on Sunday, to clean the city’s beach of litter following its annual Pride celebrations.

The Big Pride Beach Clean saw more than two tonnes of waste collected from two separate 1km stretches of Brighton Beach on Sunday 4 August, then manually sorted by volunteers to maximise the recycling rate.

The result was around 1.5 tonnes of plastics, metal and glass litter was sent off for recycling; the group was able to recycle more plastics than is usually possible locally, by collaborating with London-based TerraCycle UK. The remaining half a tonne of unrecyclable litter was sent to be incinerated at Veolia’s Energy from Waste facility in Newhaven.

Support journalism that inspires and empowers people Good journalism has a cost. As an independent media organisation, to publish our inspiring journalism we rely on financial contributions from people like you, who share our vision for a more constructive and balanced media. Support Positive News from just £1

The group behind the initiative, Ocean’s 8 Brighton, said they were inspired by the Hollywood film about women with common expertise working together to achieve something. “Our expertise is in environmental issues and we want to use this collaboration to deliver initiatives which engage people. The Big Pride Beach Clean is an excellent example of that,” said Melanie Rees, founder of the group and creative director of The Brighton Green Centre.

Pride organisers also got behind the campaign and encouraged attendees to its city-wide celebrations to join the Pride Big Beach Clean via its website. “In the spirit of collaboration we wanted to support a collective approach to maintaining a cleaner, more sustainable city,” said Paul Kemp, managing director of Brighton and Hove Pride CIC.

“Thanks to the hard work of Oceans 8 Brighton and over 1,000 volunteers registered for the Big Pride Beach Clean, all the rubbish was collected and sorted for recycling in just a few hours leaving the beach ready for the weekend visitors to the city.

Image: Alex Bamford

Fed up with negative news? Can you help us?

The negativity bias in the media is holding society back. While it’s important to report problems and hold power to account, we believe there is also a need for rigorous reporting on progress, possibility and solutions. We call this ‘constructive journalism’, and to keep doing it we need your help.

We know you want Positive News to benefit as many people as possible, so we haven’t put up a paywall. We don’t answer to and rely on a wealthy proprietor because, instead, we are owned co-operatively by 1,500 of our readers who joined our crowdfund in 2015. And we’re not beholden to advertisers either, because we know that you only want to hear about companies that have a positive impact.

So, instead, we depend on you. Positive News is more than a magazine, it’s a community of people who see and share the good in the world. We need your support to continue publishing our inspiring journalism and to set the example for other media to follow. It’s quick and easy to contribute and you can support Positive News from just £1. Every contribution makes a vital difference. Thank you for helping us to change the news for good.

GET A ROUND-UP OF POSITIVE NEWS STORIES IN YOUR INBOX EVERY WEEKSign up to our newsletter